Infant, Control Thyself

I-LABSMedia Coverage, Popular Articles, Publication, Research

The latest I-LABS research shows that toddlers who watch an argument use that emotional information to avoid making adults angry. The study, led by I-LABS’ Betty Repacholi and Andrew Meltzoff, shows that children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people’s social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior. “Through studying … Read More

Learning by Watching, Toddlers Show Intuitive Understanding of Probability

I-LABSMedia Coverage, Publication, Research

I-LABS’ Anna Waismeyer and Andrew Meltzoff report that 24-month-olds can make sense of imperfect cause-and-effect relationships. The latest research from I-LABS shows that toddlers as young as 24-months-old intuitively understand probability in a cause-and-effect game in which the children had to choose which strategy was more likely to work. I-LABS’ Waismeyer and Andrew Meltzoff and co-author Alison Gopnik at the … Read More

New research: Infant brains ‘rehearse’ speech mechanics while listening

I-LABSResearch

baby and parent

 A new finding was published in the July 14, 2014 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Research in 7- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. This suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they … Read More

New research highlights importance of live interaction for children

I-LABSOutreach, Research

Sarah Roseberry Lytle

New study has found that children are able to learn more effectively through live interaction and video chat technology.  A new study conducted by the UW, Temple University (TU), and the University of Delaware (UDEL), has found that children are able to learn more effectively through live interaction and video chat technology such as Skype, as opposed to watching a … Read More

New Research: While in womb, babies begin learning language from their mothers

I-LABSMedia Coverage, Popular Articles, Research

Each time a newborn sucks on the pacifier, a computer delivers sound into the headphones. The sounds are computer-generated versions of vowels. Infants in both countries were tested with English and Swedish vowels. This newborn in Sweden is listening to an English vowel; after long pause in sucking, the vowel is changed. The number of sucking responses to each vowel … Read More