Toshiaki Imada, Ph.D.

Research Professor

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Bio

Dr. Toshiaki Imada is a Research Professor in the UW Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences and Technical Director of the I-LABS MEG Brain Imaging Center.

Dr. Imada trained in electric and electronics engineering, graduated from the University of Tokyo in 1971, and received his Ph.D. from the same university in 1976. After joining Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) in 1976, he began conducting research on human visual information-processing mechanisms from a psychological, physiological, and engineering point of view. He has worked for NTT for 26 years.

In 1984, Dr. Imada started researching human auditory and visual information-processing in the brain using magnetoencephalography (MEG), a cutting-edge neuroimaging technique. In Japan, he was the first to record spontaneous magnetic activity and visually-evoked magnetic activity in the brain using a single-channel SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) system.

Since then, Dr. Imada has been working on brain information-processing mechanisms using various neuroimaging methods. He has published influential papers on MEG and other neuroimaging methodologies, and on brain mechanisms, especially auditory and visual information-processing mechanisms. He is also interested in computer modeling of brain mechanisms, and is the author of the Japanese book Artificial Intelligence. He also wrote chapters in two Japanese books about MEG, Neuromagnetism and Fundamentals and Clinical Application of Magnetoencephalography.

Dr. Imada currently serves on the board of directors of the Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society (chaired by Professor Shinya Kuriki).
The Finnish newspaper Tekniikka ja Talous (Technology and Economy) has reported on Dr. Imada's work on brain mechanisms. The Japanese newspapers Asahi, Nikkei, and others have written about his research on the human auditory system, which has also been widely covered by the Japan Broadcasting Corporation NHK (Nippon HosoKyokai).

Dr. Imada lives in Seattle with his family. He enjoys tennis, skiing, and the traditional Japanese mental games "go" and "shogi." He also likes to travel.

CV

Educational Background

Ph.D., University of Tokyo (Electronics Engineering, 1976)
M.A., University of Tokyo (Electronics Engineering, 1973)
B.A., University of Tokyo (Electrical Engineering, 1971)

 

Academic Positions Held

Technical Director, I-LABS MEG Brain Imaging Center, UW Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, 2010-Present
Research Professor, University of Washington Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 2006 (June)-present
Visiting Professor, University of Washington Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 2002-2006 (May)
Visiting Professor, Tokyo Denki University, Research Center for Advanced Technologies, 2002-present
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) Senior Manager (Human Information Research Lab), 1999-2002
Group Leader (IMADA Research Group), 1989-1999
Assistant Director (Information Sciences Lab), 1988-1989
Senior Research Scientist, Supervisor (Information & Communications Lab), 1985-1988
Senior Staff Scientist (Information & Communications Lab), 1984-1985
Assistant Chief (Basic Research Labs), 1982-1984
Staff Scientist (Basic Research Labs), 1980-1982
Scientist (Basic Research Labs), 1976-1980
Guest Lecturer, University of Tokyo Graduate School, 1996-1997
Guest Lecturer, Osaka University Graduate School, 1993-1994

 

Professional Offices, Awards, and Affiliations

Associate Editor, The Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society, 1996-1999; 2001-2002
Editorial Board Member, The Journal of The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers, 1990-1993
Research Affiliate, Low Temperature Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, 2000, 1993-1995, 1990-1991
Research Affiliate, Communications Research Laboratory, Ministry of Post and Telecommunications, 1995-1997
Board of Directors, Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society, 1997-present
Board of Trustees, Subcommittee for High Performance SQUID systems, 146th Committee for Superconducting Electronics, Japan Society for Promotion of Science, 1991-present
Board of Trustees, Society for Noninvasive Localization of Brain Functions, 1994-1998
Board of Trustees, Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetics Society, 1993-1997

Publications

Auditory Functions

 
Watanabe, M., & Imada, T. (2003). Off-response to pure tone is not enhanced by the previous tone presented to the other ear. The Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 16, 110-111. [In Japanese]
 
Kamimoto, S., Asaka, Y., Imada, T., Sekihara, K., & Kotani, M. (2001). Auditory neuromagnetic responses to acoustic frequency change. Journal ofJapan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, in press [Japanese].
 
Watanabe, M., & Imada, T. (2001). Effect of preceding tone intensity on the auditory magnetic fields evoked by a pure tone. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, in press [Japanese].
 
Watanabe, M., & Imada, T. (2000). Effect of preceding pure tone frequency on the auditory magnetic fields evoked by a pure tone. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 13, 57-65 [Japanese].
 
Watanabe, M., & Imada, T. (1999). Effect of the preceding pure tone on the auditory magnetic fields evoked by a pure tone. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 12, 19-25 [Japanese].
 
Watanabe, M., & Imada, T. (1998). Frequency of paired tone and auditory evoked magnetic fields. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 11, 15-21 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1998). Auditory evoked brain magnetic fields. In Y. Kuroiwa & M. Sonoo (Eds.), Clinical handbook of evoked potentials (pp. 268-281). Tokyo: Chugai-Igaku-Sha [Japanese].
 
Nakagawa, S., Ueno, S., & Imada, T. (1998). Auditory evoked magnetic fields and stimulus serial position. Journal of Magnetics Society of Japan, 22, 785-788 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T., Watanabe, M., Mashiko, M., Kawakatsu, M., & Kotani, M. (1997). The silent period between sounds has a stronger effect than the interstimulus interval on auditory evoked magnetic fields. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 102, 37-45.
 
Imada, T., Kawakatsu, M., Mashiko, T., & Kotani, M. (1995). Auditory evoked brain magnetic fields and the interstimulus interval. Japanese Journal of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, 33, 15-23. [Japanese].
 
Hayashi, M. Imada, T., Mashiko, T., & Odaka, K. (1995). Source localization of auditory magnetic fields evoked by pure tones and vowels. Japanese Journal of Electroencephalography and Electromyography, 23, 303-311 [Japanese].
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Yoshikawa, K., Mizuta, T., Imada, T., & Hayashi, M. (1994). Neuromagnetic measurements of the human primary auditory response. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 96, 348-356.
Imada, T., Hari, R., McEvoy, L., Norman, L., & Sams, M. (1993).
 
Determinants of the Auditory Mismatch Response. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 87, 144-153.
 
McEvoy, L., Hari, R., Imada, T., & Sams, M. (1993). Human auditory cortical mechanisms of sound lateralization: II. Interaural time differences at sound onset. Hearing Research, 67, 98-109.

 

Visual Functions

 
Watanabe, K., Imada, T., Nihei, K., & Shimojo, S. (2002). Neuromagnetic responses to chromatic flicker: Implications for photosensitivity. Neuroreport, 13, 2161-2165.
 
Kondo, T., Imada, T., Sekihara, K., & Kotani, M. (in press). Neuromagnetic activity associated with recognition of visual patterns. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1997). Visually-evoked brain magnetic fields. In H. Hara & S. Kuriki (Eds.), Neuromagnetism (pp. 217-229). Tokyo: Ohmsha [Japanese].
Imada, T. (1996). Neuroimaging--Magnetic Fields from Brain: VISION. The Journal of the Vision Society of Japan, 8, 1-8 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1996). Neuromagnetic responses to visual information. Image Lab, 7, 10-14 [Japanese].
 
Odaka, K., Imada, T., Mashiko, T., & Hayashi, M. (1996). Discrepancy between brain magnetic fields elicited by pattern and luminance stimulations in the fovea: Adequate stimulus positions and a measure of discrepancy. Brain Topography, 8, 309-316.
 
Imada, T. (1995). Neuromagnetic responses to visual stimuli. Journal of the Institute of Television Engineers of Japan, 50, 443-449, [Japanese].
 
Odaka, K., Mashiko, T., Imada, T., & Hayashi, M. (1993). Measurement of visually-evoked magnetic fields by local stimulations in various visual fields. Journal of Mechatronics & Robotics, 5, 232-235.
 
Imada, T., & Yodogawa, E. (1985). Feature extraction processing time in human visual system. Japanese Psychological Research, 27, 11-20.
 
Imada, T., & Yodogawa, E. (1984). Critical SOAs in pattern-by-pattern and pattern-by-flash masking: A study on contour formation process. Psychologia, 27, 22-29.
 

Sensorimotor Functions

Hari, R., & Imada, T. (1999). Ipsilateral movement-evoked fields (MEFs) reconsidered. NeuroImage, 10, 582-588.
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Kimura, T., & Imada, T. (1998). Human somatosensory evoked magnetic fields to vibratory stimulation of the index finger: Is there frequency organization in SI? Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 109, 454-461.
 
Iwase, Y., Kurosawa, H., Mashiko, T., Imada, T., & Hashimoto, I. (1997). Computer simulation of action potentials as compared with measured magnetic action fields in peripheral nerve lesions: Interpretation of an oscillating phenomenon. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 10, 17-28 [Japanese].
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., & Imada, T. (1996). Somatic evoked high-frequency magnetic oscillations reflect activity of inhibitory interneurons in the human somatosensory cortex. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 100, 189-203.
 
Iwase, Y., Yamauchi, Y., Ochiai, N., Mashiko, T., Imada, T., & Hashimoto, I. (1996). Multichannel detection of magnetic compound action fields in peripheral nerve lesions. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 9, 1-12 [Japanese].
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Imada, T., & Yoshikawa, K. (1995). Bases and clinical applications of peripheral magnetic neurogram. Clinical Electroencephalography, 37, 227-233 [Japanese].
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Mizuta, T., Imada, T., Iwase, Y., Okazaki, H., & Yoshikawa, K. (1995). Multichannel detection of magnetic compound action fields with stimulation of the index and little fingers. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 97, 102-113.
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Imada, T., & Mizuta, T. (1994). Peripheral nerve magnetic fields. Neurological Medicine, 40, 343-354 [Japanese].
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Mizuta, T., Imada, T., Iwase, K., & Okazaki, H. (1994). Visualization of a moving quadrupole with magnetic measurements of peripheral nerve action fields. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 93, 459-467.
 
Hashimoto, I., Mashiko, T., Odaka, K., & Imada, T. (1992). Multichannel measurements of movement-related magnetic fields. Clinical Electroencephalography, 34, 646-652 [Japanese].
 

 

Higher-Order Brain Functions

Imada, T. (2000). Brain activity while recognizing Kana and Kanji characters. Clinical Electroencephalography, 42, 772-779 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (2000). Character recognition mechanisms in the brain revealed by magnetoencephalography. Brain Science, 22, 645-651 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T., Kawakatsu, M., Kotani, M., & Tojo, M. (2000). Neuromagnetic signals associated with reading a Kanji character formed by combining two Kanji radicals. Japanese Psychological Research, 42, 15-25.
 
Imada, T. (1999). Brain activity associated with reading Japanese characters: Studies by functional neuroimaging methods. Advances in Neurological Sciences, 43(4), 572-583, [Japanese].
 
Iwaki, S., Imada, T., Ueno, S., & Tonoike, M. (1999). Dynamic cortical activation in mental image processing revealed by biomagnetic measurement. NeuroReport, 10, 1793-1797.
 
Nakagawa, S., Ueno, S., & Imada, T. (1999). Measurements and source estimations of extremely low frequency brain magnetic fields in a short-term memory task by a whole-head neuromagnetometer. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 35, 4130-4132.
 
Asakawa, K., Imada, T., Kawakatsu, M., & Kotani, M. (1999). Neuromagnetic responses to reading Kanji and Kana characters. Journal of Japan Biomagnetism and Bioelectromagnetic Society, 12, 11-18 [Japanese].
 
Nakagawa, S., Ueno, S., Yamanami, K., Iwaki, S., Ueno, K., & Imada, T. (1998). MEG measurement and source estimation of brain activities associated with a delayed paired comparison task. Journal of Magnetics Society of Japan, 22, 781-784 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T., Kawakatsu, M., & Kotani, M. (1996). Analysis of magnetic signals related to reading Japanese characters (hiragana). In I. Hashimoto, Y.C. Okada & S. Ogawa (Eds.), Visualization of Information Processing in the Human Brain: Recent Advances in MEG and Functional MRI (Supplement 47 to Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology) (pp.199-208). Amsterdam: Elsevier Science B. V.
 
Imada, T. (1995). Higher order brain functions revealed by MEG. Advanced Medicine, 2, 39-42 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1994). Brain magnetic fields related to higher order brain functions. In K. Takakura & S. Okubo (Eds.), Magnetoencephalography fundamentals and clinical application (pp. 158-174). Tokyo: Asakura [Japanese].
 
Kawakatsu, M., Imada, T., Mashiko, T., & Kotani, M. (1995). Neuromagnetic responses to the visually-presented Kanji characters and random dot patterns. Japanese Journal of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, 33, 318-326 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1993). Evoked magnetic fields related to memory and attention activities. Medical Imaging Technology, 11(4), 483-491, [Japanese].
 
Kuriki, S., & Imada, T. (1997). Brain magnetic fields related to higher order brain functions. In H. Hara & S. Kuriki (Eds.), Neuromagnetism (pp. 229-246). Tokyo: Ohmsha [Japanese].
 
Moroo, I., Imada, T., & Yamada, T. (1992). Correlation between prestimulus EEG power spectrum and P300 peak latency. Clinical Electroencephalography, 34, 493-497 [Japanese].
 

General MEG, Computational MEG, and Apparatus

 
Iwaki, S., Ueno, S., & Imada, T. (1998). Source estimation of the magnetic field evoked by a mental rotation task. Journal of Magnetics Society of Japan, 22, 777-780 [Japanese].
 
Odaka, K., Imada, T., Mashiko, T., & Hayashi, M. (1996). A portable magnetic-noise free visual stimulator for MEG measurements. Transactions of the Institute of Electronics and Communication Engineers, 79-D, 165-169.
 
Imada, T. (1995). Noninvasive observations of human brains. Journal of the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers, 78, 309-312 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1995). Magnetoencephalography: Recording brain activities. Journal of Telecommunications Association, 58, 43-50 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1994). Brain Magnetism, 63, 220-239. Kyoto, Japan: Bussei Kenkyu [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1993). Research on information-processing mechanisms in the human brain by brain magnetic field measurement. NTT Research & Development, 42, 705-716 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1993). Magnetoencephalography. Journal of Technology Transfer (JTT), 16, 2-4 [Japanese].
 
Kodama, Y., Aihara, K., Imada, T., & Kotani, M. (1993). A correlation dimensional analysis of MEG data. Japanese Journal of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, 31, 339-345 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1991). Measurement and analysis of brain magnetic field. Journal of Institute of Electronics, Information and CommunicationEngineers, 74, 1298-1306 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1990). Revealing brain mechanisms by magnetoencephalography. Journal of NTT Technology, 2, 77-80 [Japanese].
 
 

Artificial Intelligence, Neural Networks, and Others

Imada, T. (2005). How does the brain work when hearing speech sounds? -- Human auditory-language neural system, neuroimaging, and artificial intelligence. Journal of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, 20, 94-103. [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1999). MRI, biological engineering, magnetoencephalography, and PET. In Y. Nakajima, K. Ando, M. Koyasu, Y. Sakano, K. Shigemasu, M. Tachibana, & Y. Hakoda (Eds.), Dictionary of psychology (pp. 70, 497, 674, & 782). Tokyo: Yuhikaku [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1992). Brain and its mysterious functions. In I. Takeuchi (Ed.), AI rhapsody (pp. 181-203). Tokyo: NTT Press [Japanese].
 
Imada, T. (1991). Nervous system. In S. Shimada (Ed.), Human brain and artificial intelligence (Translation) (pp. 342-373). Tokyo: Maruzen [Japanese].
Imada, T. (1987). Artificial intelligence. Tokyo: Ohmsha [Japanese].
 
Imada, T., Sone, S., & Utsunomiya, T. (1977). On the associative memory with the convergent recollection method. Transactions of Institute of Electronics and Communication Engineers, 60-D, 224-231 [Japanese].
 
Imada, T., Sone, S., & Utsunomiya, T. (1977). Memory machine that has some functions of the human brain. Transactions of the Institute of Electronics and Communication Engineers, 60-D(7), 491-498 [Japanese].

Contact

Phone Number: 
(206) 543-4541